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The strange psychology of choosing well

Posted 3/30/2018 10:58am by Shiloh Avery.


Eat your colors! Join our harvest share program 

 

I got back from the “Body Pump” workout the other day feeling SO good. I mean my legs barely carried the rest of me out of there and I collapsed in the chair when I got home, but later, after rest, and even the next morning, I felt really good! This is something I know. Not just from reading about how exercise and healthy diet can improve overall feeling of well-being, but from my own personal experience.

Why, then, is it still so incredibly difficult to drag myself out to the gym to do something that makes me feel so good? Am I just that shortsighted that I can’t project out even a single day? When I’m feeling good, I can easily connect the dots in reverse to understand that “Body Pump” made me feel this way, but tomorrow, it’s like I’ve already forgotten. I hem and haw and drag my feet and reach deep for that will power I know I left somewhere.

I know sticking to a healthy diet can feel the same way. That’s a bit easier for organic vegetable farmers, because organic vegetables are what we have on hand all the time. Plus we’re isolated out here on the farm and don’t have a lot processed food “temptations” poking their cute little heads out at us saying “Pick me! Pick me! Pick me!” But I can sympathize how hard it can be to eat healthy even though it makes us feel so good!

Let us help you with that! Join our harvest share program and have fresh organic local vegetables and fruit on hand all the time (starting in May). It works a bit like a magazine subscription: you purchase your share now (when we’re purchasing all of our seeds and supplies and paying employees to grow your food) and receive a box of fresh organic in-season produce each week for 20 weeks (beginning in May). With veggies already in your fridge, you’re much more likely to stick to a healthy diet. Learn more here! Contact us with any questions, and sign up here.

 

Benefits of the Tumbling Shoals Farm Harvest Share (with lots of quotes from “In Defense of Food” by Michael Pollan):

Benefits to you:

  • Eat more fruits and vegetables!  (it’s like a pre-paid fitness club membership-if you’ve already paid, you’re more likely to use it, with all those fresh ripe nutritious veggies already purchased and in your fridge, you’re more likely to get more of them into your diet!)

 

  • Eat the freshest organic produce around:  “Recently a handful of well-controlled comparisons of crops grown organically and conventionally have found appreciably higher levels of antioxidants, flavanoids, vitamins and other nutrients in several of the organic crops.  Of course, after a few days riding cross-country in a truck the nutritional quality of any kind of produce will deteriorate, so ideally you want to look for food that is both organic and local.”  

 

  • Improve the diet through diverse, seasonal eating:  “[When purchasing locally] you automatically eat food that is in season, which is usually when it is most nutritious…eating in  season also tends to diversify your diet-because you can’t buy strawberries or broccoli or potatoes twelve months of the year, you’ll find yourself experimenting with other foods when they come into the market….The CSA box does an even better job of forcing you out of your dietary rut because you’ll find things in your weekly allotment that you would never buy on your own.”

 

  • Planning meals made easier:  “What’s for dinner” gets easier when you are eating seasonally because you begin with what’s in your box and build the meal from there.  Instead of “what in the world should I make for dinner,” it becomes, “Let’s find a good recipe for squash (or carrots, or broccoli, etc)”

 

  • You support the local food chain and the local economy (it’s like voting with your tongue!). Your support keeps your local farms in business and contributes to the local food security

 

  • Shake the hand that feeds you:  “[In the industrial food system] a wall of ignorance intervenes between consumers and producers and that wall fosters a certain carelessness on both sides.  Farmers can lose sight of the fact that they’re growing food for actual eaters rather than for middlemen, and consumers can easily forget that growing good food takes care and hard work.”

 

  • Build a food community: attend Tumbling Shoals Farm events and meet others on the ark of local food

Benefits to us:

  • We get to know who we’re feeding:  “Accountability becomes once again a matter of relationships instead of regulation or labeling or legal liability.  Food safety didn’t become a national or global problem until the industrialization of the food chain attenuated the relationships between food producers and eater.”

 

  • Because you’ve purchased your share ahead of the season, we have income right at the time we are purchasing all our seasonal supplies, but don’t yet have another income stream

 

  • Knowing how many families we’re feeding ahead of time makes planning how much of each crop to grow a lot easier!

 

  • Building a food community: We love getting together with other people interested in food and cooking and eating.  Let’s eat together!    

 

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